The Hardest Thing to Market: Me

No company’s marketing has moved me in the past few years quite the way that Chubbies has.

Chubbies makes short shorts for frat bros, and they are on a crusade to rid the world of cargo shorts one pair of gingham print “Danny Dukes” at a time.

The mission is concise and clear, and in a startup world full of “It’s this for that!” and 200-floor elevator pitches, I appreciate the focus. Maybe Chubbies wants to be this huge lifestyle brand one day. Maybe they have this big, broader vision in mind. It’s possible, in fact, probable, given what I know of founders so far. But that they were able to dodge the shiny objects and channel those dreams into a single focus is an accomplishment to be revered. (more…)

How to Get Better Feedback at Work

Whether it’s just another quick set of eyes on a blog post or a deep conversation about your career direction, getting great advice can be really helpful. It can even be life-changing. At first blush, feedback may seem like something you take as it comes to you. But there are some things you can do to proactively get the help and advice you need to improve your work.

1) Distance Yourself From The Work

Taking ownership and responsibility is much different than taking everything to heart and associating your self-worth with your job. This is essential for startup employees in particular to understand. To join a startup, a certain level of passion or at least personal interest is necessary in order to choose a risky, fledgling business over stable corporate life. But to incorporate people’s feedback into the projects you do at that startup, you need to balance your heart with your head and take an objective approach. A mental distance between you and the work impacts how you ask for feedback and how you receive feedback. (more…)

Career and Life Update, the Sequel

As you could tell from my last post, I was in a career transition mode in December. I’m excited to share that I officially joined One Mighty Roar to lead marketing for our Internet of Things platform, Robin.

One Mighty Roar began as a digital marketing agency. Through client work we developed a few different products. One of the products was technology for connected experiences, so now we are rolling those capabilities out into a spin-off Internet of Things platform called Robin. We launch this spring and you can sign up for our beta here, although I think the audience that reads this blog would be more interested in just learning about the Internet of Things and subscribing to our blog. (more…)

Career and Life Update

By now, the 12 of you who read this blog have heard about my next career steps. But just in case there is a 13th or 14th person who hasn’t been texted, emailed or joined me for coffee or wine over the past few weeks – here is your update.

I’m no longer at Localytics. I’m doing some marketing consulting right now as I re-energize, explore and figure out my next career steps. In particular, I’m excited to be working with the awesome people at One Mighty Roar on all things marketing. If your company needs help with content strategy, messaging or anything else (I’m well-rounded) – reach out! If I’m not a fit for a project I’ll try to introduce you to someone who is. (more…)

9 Tips for Managing a Website Redesign

At Localytics I managed a big company rebrand and website redesign. We launched this in conjunction with new pricing, a new UI and three big new features. (We were busy!) It’s been a few months since the site launched in August, and the time has helped me process the experience and consolidate my thoughts into some website redesign tips.

Ready? Okay.

1) Identify the Website Redesign Decision Makers

Many people will have opinions about a redesign. However, it’s not realistic to have an entire company chime in on every little decision. First, you need to narrow down the feedback team, identify the key representatives from each department and strategically involve those people in the right conversations. Second, to ensure the decision-making process goes as smoothly as possible, you need determine whose opinion and approval is nice to have and whose opinion and approval is a must-have. (more…)

Moving From a Small Startup to a Bigger Startup

Most of my few readers know by now that I’ve moved on to a new gig as the Content Marketing Manager at Localytics, an app analytics and marketing company.

At 40 people, this is a bigger company than Shareaholic was. I wanted to reflect a little on the experience of working at different sizes of companies, as I’ve now worked at 6-10 person, 40-person and 300-something person companies.

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Lean In: Content Marketing for a Product Launch

Over the past few weeks I’ve really enjoyed the increased conversation about women in the work place sparked by the launch of Sheryl Sandberg’s new book, Lean In. The conversation was enhanced by Marissa Mayer’s decision to ban working from home at Yahoo. I haven’t read the book yet, but I’ve been following all things Sheryl Sandberg for a while and I have heard the book taps into a lot of the themes of her popular TED talk, so I’m familiar with her points of view.

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Don’t Forget to Look At The Clock

A while back a friend sent me this post from Mark Suster – Some Sage Advice For Young Employees Early In Their Careers. The post has some great stuff in there, although in my opinion a lot of it is more applicable for folks in bigger companies and not startups. There was one particular piece of advice I would add for entry-level – middle management people at companies of all sizes:

Get really good at estimating how long tasks take you and have the confidence and organization to honestly communicate those timeframes. 

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Untargeted Content Marketing

I don’t often learn something in a blog post that really sticks with me, but Kinvey VP of Marketing Joe Chernov published a guest post on the Content Marketing Institute blog a while back that offered content marketers one very good question: “Do you have permission to publish this content?”

Joe writes:

“There is a funny storyline in NBC’s hit series, “30 Rock” in which Alec Baldwin’s character, the revenue-obsessed programming honcho for a Podunk cable network, decides the company should manufacture sofas. He implausibly argues it’s a natural fit for a television network to make furniture because viewers sit on furniture while watching TV.

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